Take that Roy Black…a voice for victims talks back regarding the “false allegations” hysteria

Perps 1 Victims 0

Until Susan Brownmiller wrote a rebuttal to Roy Black’s power-to-the-perps article (see post below for Black’s article) that is.

Accused rapists don’t need more protections

Roy Black says with bitterness that it’s easier today than it’s ever been to get a conviction. He should have said that it is hypothetically easier to get a conviction. Rape is still the most under-reported crime in the nation, and convictions for rape have not increased dramatically since rape shield laws were put into effect during the 1970s to level the courtroom playing field by limiting the scope of inquiry into a victim’s past sexual history. I am all for rape shield laws because there are too many people out there who still want a rape victim to be pure in the Santa Maria Goretti tradition. Eleven-year-old Maria Goretti (1890-1902) was canonized as a saint for gladly dying in her struggle to defend her virginity in a sexual assault. Santa Maria does not match the profile of a typical rape victim.

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Sympathy for the accused

So many rape-related articles are upsetting – this one is down-right distressing in how pro-perp it is.

Why we should protect those accused of rape

Here’s my comment, please consider commenting yourself:

More sympathy for the accused than the abused

This is one of the most ridiculous perp-protecting rubish I’ve ever read.

1) It’s not the “alleged victim” (bias), it’s the accuser.

2) Victims are not always granted anonymity – many victims’ names have turned up in the press, where they are also bashed and blamed.

3)If you take away victims’ anonymity, other victims couldn’t come forward (ie, more protection for the perp-and that seems exactly what you’re seeking)

4) An “electronic nanny”? Gosh, you can’t even hide your misogyny.

5) The “suffering of rape defendents” – ohmygosh. Have you read, Is it worse to be a rapist or a racist (Hint – the word has a c in it). MOST RAPISTS GET AWAY WITH RAPE. Most cases are not reported. According to RAIN, only 6% of rapists WILL EVER SERVE TIME IN JAIL.

6) There’s a far greater stigma for men accused of rape than victims? Not only will the media bash and blame victims, the comment sections on rape articles are so atrocious and sexist, it’s stomach-turning.

7) Easier to charge and convict? Have you ever in talked to a rape victim? Have you talked to organizations that help men and women who’ve been raped? Have you done an iota of research?

This is simply rubish. Perp-protecting, entitled, stereotyping (of women as false accusers) rubbish that I’ve ever read.

AND

The media print more articles on false allegations (which often dont explain context), which skews the thinking that there’s a hysteria of women accusing men of rape. Most credible stats put false allegations at 8-10% and most credible organizations will explain things like a person recanting, police not believing a victim, etc.

If you look at the Innocence Project, false allegations are not listed as one of the leading reasons of wrongful imprisonment – but media bias would have the public perceive it as such.

Media use the term false allegation for women, but not for men. For men, terms depicting skill or talent (set up, framed, etc.) are used.

Media refrain from stating that men also make false allegations, and that, in family court, research (Bala &Schumann) find that men make more false allegations (neglect, unfit) than women.

But, then again, stereotypes have more branding power than mere facts, And, nobody is stopping writers like Roy Black from using stereotypes rather than facts.

https://mediamisses.wordpress.com

Furthermore

, if you look at the history of the Victims Rights Movement, you’ll see there are more deniers than liars. Deniers have been the backlash which tries to thwart progress. Denying abuse lets it go unimpeded and can result in further abuse and murder.

Look at judges like Judge Lemkau who called Katie Tagle a liar (transcript on Internet) -and you’ll see the results of this stereotype – the judge called her a liar, gave her husband custody of the infant, and 10 days later both were found dead. Look at articles on rape & domestic violence and see the perps background – often enough, rather than locking him up, he was permitted by a lax criminal justice system to continue to abuse people (Jaycee Duggard). Often enough, in domestic violence, the perp is the “nice guy” that kills wife and/or kids.

What we need is a society that helps victims press charges – not a society that helps protect perps.

There is not one of us immune from having charges pressed against us. What we can do, is keep the press from using bias and judgement and see to it that perps are punished so they don’t keep abusing.

Child rape cases

Here’s an interesting article on the recent rape cases involving 11-year-old girls:

A sane look at child gang rape cases

Tracy Clark Flory interviewed an expert from the Crimes Against Children Research Center and he said this (his words are in quotations):

Gang rape is very rare — but, interestingly enough, he says juveniles make up the majority of offenders in those cases. “Juveniles are much more likely to commit almost all of their criminal acts in crowds,” he explains. “Peer pressure is strong at that age and resistance skills are not.”

But the bad news is:

Now for the especially sad news: It isn’t rare for a sexual assault victim to be so very young. Stunningly, 67 percent of all sexual assault cases — from forcible fondling to rape — involve underage victims, and 34 percent are under the age of 12, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Justice. [Yeah, just take a moment to let that soak in.] The majority are female, and “the risk of being the victim of forcible rape increased dramatically from age 10 to age 14, where it peaked,” the report says. As for the prevalence of child sexual abuse as a whole, it’s tough to nail down a reliable estimate, because it’s hugely underreported. Estimates range from 1.2 to 1.9 cases per 1,000 children. On a seemingly positive note, the number of substantiated cases is in a sharp decline — but he explains that doesn’t necessarily mean that the actual incidence of abuse is down.

The incredibly frustrating idea that women and girls ASK to be raped

Rape me, rape me; Oh, please, rape me.

I’m sorry, but I can’t imagine anyone thinking or saying these words, so how on Earth people think women and girls ASK to be raped is beyond my thinking.

If you haven’t yet read this, Keli Goff had a very good article on Salon about the gang-rape of the 11-year-old girl:

Of course she was asking for it

Of course she was. Why else would 18 men and boys rape her?

This case is still on my mind. It’s on my mind when I take a shower. It’s on my mind when I hear about other sexual assaults. When I hear about other crimes (the kind that doesn’t involve victim-blaming, which tends to be those involving strangers or male victims).

Goff brings up the Polanski case and adds a link to the Hollywood petition asking for him to be excused – I’ve added it here too. It sickened me to see how many celebs believe a pedophile should go unpunished: Petition 

She brings up several other cases to support her argument and, interestingly, mentioned how some judges even believe trafficked girls are actually “bad girls.”

Here’s Goff’s ending:

Maybe the reason we can’t get our criminal justice system and others in power to take sexual crimes against children more seriously is because too many of them believe that under the right (or rather wrong) circumstances they too could find themselves the accidental “victim” of the seductive charms of a young siren — whose age they really didn’t know (wink, wink.)

And wouldn’t that be terrible for them to find their lives ruined?

Especially if she was really asking for it.

 It’s not the first time somebody has pointed out that men in power can relate to the story or crime. For instance, it’s been said that white male writers/editors write about the “nice guy” that “snaps” and kills his wife because — well, that could be him in that position. It makes sense – rarely to I read that minorities are “nice guys” that “snap” when they commmit a crime.

Goff’s article has 486 comments at the moment. The last comment I read proved that people STILL didn’t get it:

CapriRS302 said:

WHen someone says “she was asking for it” they are not trying to put blame on the victim AND take it away from the perpetrato­r, they are just trying to point out that there were bad decisions that were made beforehand by the victim that led to the situation.

If I were to take a shortcut through a dark alley at night instead of walking around a few blocks or calling a cab and I got mugged, it would be the same type of thing.

What does it take to educate people on victim-blaming?
Here was my reply to Capri:
If someone said ‘she was asking for it’ – and “it” meant “rape” – then, yes, it’s blaming the victim. Nobody asks to be raped. Nobody asks to be mugged. Nobody asks to be killed. Period.

If bad decisions were made – well, they’re just bad decisions. No one can predict the future – no one can predict an assault. Bad decisions don’t cause or lead to rape. Rapists rape. It’s the rapist’s behavior – and the perp must take full accountabi­lity of committing a CRIME.

People make bad decisions every day. They don’t deserve to be punished for it. They don’t deserve to be raped, or mugged, or killed.

An 81-year-ol­d man was recently killed. He left his door open and a robber came in, stole $40. and killed him. Was he to blame? No. But he did leave his door open. Rarely do we blame victims for these crimes – but we do for rape and domestic violence.

Perps are NOT vigilantes­. They are not judges or juries. They should have no power whatsoever to punish people for bad decisions.

Here’s another article on the subject  – A REPUBLICAN joined the victim-blaming:

Sick: Republican Lawmaker likens 11 yr old rape victim to a “21 yr old prostitute” – this also links to another article on the topic, by Amanda Marcotte

 

New York Times: ‘Nice guys’ rape 11-year-old

Here’s a combination of the ‘nice guys’ rape scenario and victim-blaming. In this case, the victim is an11-year-old child. And the perpetrators are boys and men, ranging from middle-schoolers to 27 years in age. They raped the girl under the threat of a beating. In the article, the writer, James C. McKinley Jr., has quotes in the article that blames the victim (she wore make-up, dressed in clothing that made her look older; where was her mother) and praised the perps (they’ll have to live with this the rest of their lives)

Here are my thoughts:

1) Who else has reported on this? I haven’t searched it yet, but I’ve only heard about the NY Times piece. Why is it that this crime didn’t get national attention?

2) A link below has a response from the NY Times. They stand by this piece. They said the reporter used quotes – they weren’t his words. Aaaaah! So, if we can use quotes (choosing from, I assume, many quotes), we no longer are responsible!!! It’s as if those words jumped on the page themselves. I’ve encountered this problem before and I don’t buy it. The least the writer can do is interview an anti-rape advocate to counter the victim blaming.

3) When is society going to wake up? This should serve as the wake up call, but I doubt it will. A MIDDLE SCHOOLER was involved in this gang-rape. THE VICTIM WAS A CHILD.  Really? No public outrage? We should be ashamed to call ourselves humans. Having a conscience is what separates humans from animals — in this case, we are no different.

4) Men in their 20s raped this 11 year old. Hello!! This is pedophilia, folks. Why didn’t the NY Times deal with this? 

Here’s the NY Times piece: Gang rape of schoolgirl, and arrests, shakes Texas town

Here’s their reply, posted in The Cutline news blog  NY Times responds to backlash over reporting of an alleged child rape (alleged rape?! it was caught on tape, it was a rape)

The Times responded Wednesday evening to The Cutline: “Neighbors’ comments about the girl, which we reported in the story, seemed to reflect concern about what they saw as a lack of supervision that may have left her at risk,” said Danielle Rhoades Ha, a spokeswoman for the paper. “As for residents’ references to the accused having to ‘live with this for the rest of their lives,’ those are views we found in our reporting. They are not our reporter’s reactions, but the reactions of disbelief by townspeople over the news of a mass assault on a defenseless 11-year-old.”

Rhodes Ha also stressed that the paper stands by the controversial piece.

“We are very aware of and sensitive to the concerns that arise in reporting about sexual assault,” Rhoades Ha said. “This story is still developing and there is much to be learned about how something so horrific could have occurred.”

Read the NY Times letter to the editor

Mother Jones has quotes from the article & analysis: The NY Times’ rape-friendly reporting

Victim-blaming in the NY Times Cleveland gang rape article

The fword blog: Rape is the only crime in which the victim becomes the accused  (Domestic violence victims are also the “accused” – they nag or cheat or otherwise do something to deserve the beating. They, like rape victims, are also accused of lying.)

Here’s Salon’s reaction: The NY Times’ sloppy, slanted child rape story 

Here’s a petition on Change.org Tell the NY Times to apologize for blaming a child for her gang rape

Women account for 70% of serial killer victims

Salon ran this article: Why do serial killers target sex workers? by Tracy Clark-Flory. Honestly, I’m not sure why sections like Broadsheet don’t have articles with stronger positions. She wrote another article I posted here that seemed to rationalize away behavior – kind of like, boys will be boys (it was the article on the gang-rape and subsequent Facebook posting of the drugged teen girl). In this article on serial killers, she tells us serial killers attack sexworkers…because they’re easy prey. End of story.

So, does that include gay and transgendered sexworkers?  Or, ONLY WOMEN?

I posted this comment (and just noticed other posters had something similar to say):

They target women…who happen to be prostitutes

There are many easy victims in society – male prostitutes, homeless, disabled, drug dealers who would get close to a car, etc.

THEY TARGET WOMEN

Women’s groups in Atlantic City, NJ said this years ago when 4 female prostitutes were found dead – sure they’re sex workers BUT THEY ARE ALL WOMEN

Particularly when the bodies are found with things like rocks in their vaginas (Green River Killer), misogyny is at play (as if murdering females weren’t enough)

When will the media learn to SEE gender-based violence for what it is – and shame on ‘Broadsheet’ for often missing this boat as well.

 Here’s the article she references: Women account for 70 percent of serial killer victims, FBI reports

According to never-before-released FBI data, women accounted for 70 percent of the 1,398 known victims of serial killers since 1985. By comparison, women represented only 22 percent of total homicide victims.

The FBI’s Violent Criminal Apprehension Program (ViCAP), based in Quantico, Va., released the data at the request of Scripps Howard News Service. SHNS is conducting an investigation into the nation’s more than 185,000 unsolved homicides committed since 1980.

According to the FBI’s Supplementary Homicide Report, local police reported that about 33,000 homicides of women remain unsolved.

FBI agent Mark Hilts, head of the bureau’s Behavioral Analysis Unit No. 2 that profiles serial killers, said “a large number” of serial killers act with a sexual motive.

“Sex can be a motivation, but it’s a motivation in conjunction with something else — with anger, with power, with control,” Hilts said. “Most serial killers do derive satisfaction from the act of killing, and that’s what differentiates them” from those who kill to help commit or conceal another crime.

I had read once that murder is the number one cause of death among prostitutes. They’re also subject to rape, verbal abuse, physical abuse, etc. Which makes you wonder why shows like HBO’s Cathouse and others only show the positive side of prostitution. Why the positive PR? Why not discuss violence, teen prostitution, sexual slavery? Would that spoil the fun?

We really need to hold them accountable. As the saying goes, prostitution is the world’s oldest OPPRESSION.

Where’s the outrage?

Where’s the outrage when girls are raped and videotaped? Where’s the outrage when women are targeted because they’re female and killed? Where’s the language to express the horrors of being stabbed in the face and torso by a person you once loved?

Notice the difference in these 2 articles – one calls for outrage over the suicide of a young boy caught on tape having sex with another male. The other rationalizes the behavior of videotaping a teen girl being gang-raped – the video spread widely on Facebook.

With Tyler Clementi’s death, let’s try friending decency 

…we should add an urgent call to renew respect for privacy. As a community of decent people, we have to rally ourselves to stop the insanity of narcissism and exhibitionism that inculcates the broader notion that nothing is off-limits.

And-

Whether or not you agree with the anti-smoking movement, you can concede that it worked. Why not apply the same template to those who would invade another’s space? We don’t want to outlaw cameras or otherwise limit free expression, but we can certainly make it unattractive and unacceptable to intrude on others. Next time someone takes your picture or posts it on the Internet without your permission, raise the roof. Point a finger. Stand athwart civilization and yell, “No more.”

When others are victimized by another’s lack of scruples, be outraged. And never publish or distribute images of anyone without his or her permission.

Now compare this to Tracy Clark-Flory’s account of the girl who was raped and videotaped:

Teens share photos of assault on Facebook

For the most part, these are not pedophilic child pornography collectors; many of the distributors are teenagers themselves. This of course has many adults asking that age-old question: What’s wrong with kids these days? I suspect there are a couple explanations that do not require us to label “kids these days” as amoral animals.

And-

These sorts of images are the norm. We have access to them, they exist, and so we view them — duh. Carry this view a little further and it isn’t hard to understand how even a nonsociopathic teenager might opt to view a photo of a girl’s rape, or even send it along to a friend. This is so often how we share things, good and bad; we hit “forward” or “re-tweet” or “like,” etc. Technology offers us a sense of privacy, and detachment, even as we’re sharing these things with the entire Web. The online mentality is one of entitlement and total freedom, no one has ownership over anything (just ask record label execs). I would venture to say that it hasn’t even occurred to many of the kids — the ones who are not, you know, patently evil — that they are violating this girl themselves.

Forgive them sisters for they know not what they do?! I don’t think so.

This case demands as much outrage as the case of the Rutgers student. The young girl did not commit suicide, but she will be at risk for suicide as well as other mental and possibly physical repercussions.

 Please contact Tracy at Tracy@salon.com to let her know the case deserves outrage. Share the case with other media outlets, let the media know that women’s lives have as much value as men’s lives, let the media know you want to read about women, too. This case was virtually ignored by the media. The similarities should have been pointed out – it’s not just the LGBT community that faces such discrimination.