Sympathy for the accused

So many rape-related articles are upsetting – this one is down-right distressing in how pro-perp it is.

Why we should protect those accused of rape

Here’s my comment, please consider commenting yourself:

More sympathy for the accused than the abused

This is one of the most ridiculous perp-protecting rubish I’ve ever read.

1) It’s not the “alleged victim” (bias), it’s the accuser.

2) Victims are not always granted anonymity – many victims’ names have turned up in the press, where they are also bashed and blamed.

3)If you take away victims’ anonymity, other victims couldn’t come forward (ie, more protection for the perp-and that seems exactly what you’re seeking)

4) An “electronic nanny”? Gosh, you can’t even hide your misogyny.

5) The “suffering of rape defendents” – ohmygosh. Have you read, Is it worse to be a rapist or a racist (Hint – the word has a c in it). MOST RAPISTS GET AWAY WITH RAPE. Most cases are not reported. According to RAIN, only 6% of rapists WILL EVER SERVE TIME IN JAIL.

6) There’s a far greater stigma for men accused of rape than victims? Not only will the media bash and blame victims, the comment sections on rape articles are so atrocious and sexist, it’s stomach-turning.

7) Easier to charge and convict? Have you ever in talked to a rape victim? Have you talked to organizations that help men and women who’ve been raped? Have you done an iota of research?

This is simply rubish. Perp-protecting, entitled, stereotyping (of women as false accusers) rubbish that I’ve ever read.

AND

The media print more articles on false allegations (which often dont explain context), which skews the thinking that there’s a hysteria of women accusing men of rape. Most credible stats put false allegations at 8-10% and most credible organizations will explain things like a person recanting, police not believing a victim, etc.

If you look at the Innocence Project, false allegations are not listed as one of the leading reasons of wrongful imprisonment – but media bias would have the public perceive it as such.

Media use the term false allegation for women, but not for men. For men, terms depicting skill or talent (set up, framed, etc.) are used.

Media refrain from stating that men also make false allegations, and that, in family court, research (Bala &Schumann) find that men make more false allegations (neglect, unfit) than women.

But, then again, stereotypes have more branding power than mere facts, And, nobody is stopping writers like Roy Black from using stereotypes rather than facts.

https://mediamisses.wordpress.com

Furthermore

, if you look at the history of the Victims Rights Movement, you’ll see there are more deniers than liars. Deniers have been the backlash which tries to thwart progress. Denying abuse lets it go unimpeded and can result in further abuse and murder.

Look at judges like Judge Lemkau who called Katie Tagle a liar (transcript on Internet) -and you’ll see the results of this stereotype – the judge called her a liar, gave her husband custody of the infant, and 10 days later both were found dead. Look at articles on rape & domestic violence and see the perps background – often enough, rather than locking him up, he was permitted by a lax criminal justice system to continue to abuse people (Jaycee Duggard). Often enough, in domestic violence, the perp is the “nice guy” that kills wife and/or kids.

What we need is a society that helps victims press charges – not a society that helps protect perps.

There is not one of us immune from having charges pressed against us. What we can do, is keep the press from using bias and judgement and see to it that perps are punished so they don’t keep abusing.

Rape culture

I went to a conference once where the speaker had Googled ‘sexual assault’ and within a 24 hour time frame, she produced story after story of a society riddled with rape – of girls raped by men, of college students assaulted on campus, of women jogging in the park. It was startling.

Now consider how under-reported rape is. The media often focuses more on false allegations of rape than the problem of not reporting it, so most people tend to have more sympathy for the accused than the abused.

If the media reported on it, and society understood it better, perhaps we as a society could do more to prevent it. Reporting on false allegations – that just fuels the belief that people won’t believe you if you’re raped. Victim blaming will also prevent you from reporting. The recent NY Times article did just that – and did little to educate readers on the reality of rape. Here are a few more posts on the topic:

The careless language of sexual violence    

Here are some posts on campus assaults:

Students protest Dickinson College ignoring protection from sexual assault (pictures of the protest)

Dickinson college students want more information on sexual assaults on campus

Warning: the link below is highly offensive. Please hit the “report abuse” button on the upper left hand side:

Man debates: rape: deaf vs. blind

Hands down, deaf people are the better of the two to rape. If you’re raping a girl, what does she do? She cries and screams for help. Well, if she’s deaf she’ll be whining, but she won’t be calling out for someone to save her ass. She’ll squawk something that sounds like a seal with his slippery little cock slammed in a door. This will be annoying, of course, but no one will care. People will probably just think that some retard sprained her ankle. Thus, nobody will come to help her, and the neighbors will be pissed off at all the ruckus. Plus, I don’t have to stuff a sock in her mouth, which is one less thing I have to bring along in my rape tool kit, which includes the following:*.

*That’s why a deaf person is the preferred choice by many a rapist. You can sneak up behind them and they won’t hear you.

There are many more blogs and web sites with similarly offensive text (and pics). Angry Harry comes to mind. He refutes rape stats and claims most are false allegations.

Rape is a problem all over the world. I’ve posted links to articles that state 1 in 3 South African men admit to rape. I heard a woman talk about violence against women in Guatemala – she said gang members have to rape and kill girls for their initiation. She said since these men aren’t skilled in killing, they hack the body. All I could think was: they treat bulls better in Spain. And here’s a recent article about the rapes in Congo (many are classified as “atrocity rapes”):

UN squad starts work in mass rape zones 

But given the scale of conflict-zone sex assaults, Zahinda warns that his four-person unit –with two positions yet to be filled–can’t possibly respond to every incident of mass rape.

“If we were going to respond to individual cases we would be responding every second,” he told Women’s eNews in a recent phone interview. “People are raped every day in eastern Congo.”

Of course they can’t respond to every mass rape — women’s (and men’s) sexual assault are not prioritized. They go on the back burner, like many of the other issues we have.  I recently posted an article where a guy from US AID said women represented a “special interest group” and considered our human rights “pet projects.”

Women: How long are we going to take this?

Caution: Women’s “signals” lead to rape, per Justice Robert Dewar

Women, did you know you send “signals” to men to insert their penis into your vagina without your consent? There is no known list of “signals,” so, of course, it’s very subjective. One judge called make-up, tube tops and mentioning ‘going swimming’ as signals that lead to rape:

Rape victim ‘inviting,’ so no jail time

Since she clearly sent “signals” to Kenneth Rhodes, he won’t get any jail time. Does this mean we need to conform to some people’s idea of what conservative or modest attire/behavior is in order to get protection from rapists?

If we are going to be blamed for “signals’ we send to men to rape us, I think we deserve to be given this list so it won’t be left to subjective views of how women dress and behave.

Care2 also has a post on it with some good comparisons to other crimes.

More on women and journalism…

A few more interesting reads on women in journalism:

On reporters and rape: Three ideas worth rising about the cacophony

Lara Logan’s tragic sexual assault:  Apparently the fault of CBS news for sending a purty young thang out in public

If women never went anywhere where we risked being sexually assaulted, we’d never go anywhere, period. We certainly couldn’t go to work on foreign aid projects. Or to U.S. military academies. Not to college. Not on dates. Not to parties. Not to bars. Or on cruises. Not to work as models. Or security contractors. Except that even if we never went any of those places, we’d still be screwed (pun intended) because of course a high percentage of rapes happen in the home, committed by perpetrators whom the victims know. Putting the responsibility on women to prevent sexual assault by restricting their own behavior – or on their employers to limit it for them – won’t actually solve the problem, it will just reinforce gendered norms about what “good” women “should” do.

And, finally, the idea that Lara Logan was “more at risk” of sexual assault because she was attractive is laughable. I’d be interested to know what fuckability threshold women should stay below in order to be safe from rape. Could Logan have just added some thick glasses? What if she had spinach in her teeth? How about if she gained 20 pounds – then would she be safe from the mob of 200 people who apparently decided to subject her to a prolonged beating and repeated sexual assaults because her delicate beauty stirred their romantic longings? Give me a break. Rape is about power, not how cute the victim is.

I have two things to add:

1) Women can only reduce their chances of being assaulted, we cannot prevent rape – preventing rape involves preventing the behavior of rape.

2) It’s very sad the discussion of rape still has to focus on the women – her looks, her actions, what she wore… Why are her characteristics more important than the characteristics of the rapists? Why are they immune from scrutiny and accountabilty?

Athletes and sexual assaults

Okay, this is from 2003/4, but I think it’s quite interesting. Also, I’m not sure if there’s ever been research that has looked at the accusations of sexual misconduct against athletes. I found this on USA Today.

In sexual assault cases, athletes usually walk

USA TODAY research of 168 sexual assault allegations against athletes in the past dozen years suggests sports figures fare better at trial than defendants from the general population. Of those 168 allegations, involving 164 athletes, only 22 saw their cases go to trial, and only six cases resulted in convictions. In another 46 cases, a plea agreement was reached. Combined with the six athletes convicted at trial and one who pleaded guilty as charged, that gives the athletes a 32% total conviction rate in the resolved cases. That means more than two-thirds were never charged, saw the charges dropped or were acquitted.

Here’s their list of cases.

Robbie Crockett Iowa football He was accused of having sex with a 13-year-old girl in 1998 and was charged with third-degree criminal sexual conduct. Crockett pleaded guilty to one count of fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct and was sentenced to 90 days in prison and three years of probation. He was also ordered to pay fines and court costs of more than $2,700 and to pay for the victim’s counseling.

A pedophile gets 90 days in prison? Read some of the others – reduced sentences, probation only… It’s quite enlightening.

False accusations of false accusations

Baltimore makes progress on rape but has a long way to go

When Mr. Fenton interviewed victims of sexual assault — and, amazingly, current and former sex offense detectives — they described interrogations in which the police accused victims of making false accusations as cover for having cheated on a boyfriend or for having made a decision they regretted. It was, Mr. Bealefeld said at a City Council hearing on Wednesday, a unit that had “devolved into poor practices over an extended period of time.” Based on the response from the mayor and police commissioner, it’s hard to believe anyone in the unit could still believe that attitude is acceptable.