Women human right defenders experience prejudice, exclusion and violence

There’s been a lot of talk lately about women in journalism facing risks their male colleagues don’t. (Even us female bloggers face more threats and intimidating comments than our male counterparts.) And, similar to female journalists, women human rights defenders face risks and attacks that are specific to their gender. I went to Guatemala on a human rights delegation and witnessed this first hand. Most of the women working in domestic violence (for instance Norma Cruz, recipient of the Women of Courage award), violence against women, and women’s issues/rights had received death threats or were attacked (either their person or their office was attacked). Here’s a recent report announced on AWID that provides more details:

AWID

The report affirms that “women defenders are more at risk of suffering certain forms of violence and other violations, prejudice, exclusion, and repudiation than their male counterparts. This is often due to the fact that women defenders are perceived as challenging accepted socio-cultural norms, traditions, perceptions and stereotypes about femininity, sexual orientation, and the role and status of women in society.”

Report’s Findings

The risks and violations reported in the period 2004-2009 include (a) threats, death threats and killings; (b) arrest, detention, and criminalization; (c) stigmatization; and (d) sexual violence and rape. Some of the striking findings include:

  • “An alarming number of women human rights defenders and their relatives have paid the highest price for their work.” There were 39 communications to the Rapporteur regarding killings and 35 communications regarding attempted killings.
  • Defenders in the Americas are most likely to face threats, death threats, killings and attempted killings; more than half the communications relating to death threats concerned defenders working in the Americas, highlighting Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil, Honduras, and Peru. “Among the groups which appear to be most at risk are women defenders working to fight impunity for alleged human rights violations”. Special mention was made of risks to women trade unionists, women indigenous rights activists, and women environmental and land rights activists.
  • Violations against defenders working on LGBT issues were also noted.These ranged from judicial issues (arrests, judicial harassment, administrative detentions, etc.) to restrictions in freedoms of assembly, but also killings,rape and sexual violence, physical attacks, and stigmatization. Concern for LGBT defenders were specifically highlighted in Africa (Sudan and Uganda).

The report “reveals a worrying trend of criminalization of the activities carried out by women human rights defenders and those working on women’s rights or gender issues throughout the world.” This includes arrests and criminalization of the defenders’ work, as well as criminal investigations and irregularities relating to due process and fair trial procedures. “By contrast to Central and South America where threats and death threats are most commonly reported, arrests and criminalization were most commonly reported in Asia and the Pacific.” China and the Islamic Republic of Iran are mentioned in relation to concern for arrests and prison sentences. Europe and Central Asia are also mentioned regarding arrests, detentions and criminalization.

Important links

Here are a few articles that make some important links in domestic violence cases.

Domestic violence victim, Maria Garcia, “feared” getting help

She said Maria went to the police station more than once, but never filed a report. She said her friend feared talking to police would make the situation more dangerous for her four children.

Fear – not stupidity – is what often keeps women from leaving their abuser. They may be fearful for their lives, their children, or even their pets. It’s important that the media communicate this.

Dad charged with stalking daughter

Dennis Hobbs, 59, is barred by a restraining order from going near his 19-year-old daughter now.

 Police said they found a loaded gun, a video camera, a wig and a notebook detailing his daughter’s whereabouts in Hobbs’ car.

 Hobbs was dressed in black and had painted his face black, police said.

 He was arrested after being spotted driving slowly around a women’s shelter where his daughter told police she had taken refuge out of fear of an overly protective and religious father who disapproved of her relationship with her boyfriend.

 Hobbs’ attorney called it a case of a concerned father worried about his daughter living in a high-crime neighborhood.

 According to the police report, Hobbs sent his daughter several e-mails prior to his arrest.

 One read, “I love you, but there is no loving way to do what I must.”

 When he was arrested, Hobbs told police, “You just signed her death certificate.”

This is what women fear – retaliation for seeking help.

 And here’s an important link:  child custody

Lake Havasu man kills 5, then himself Suspect in custody dispute with mother of children, police say

Police said Sunday that the alleged gunman, 26-year-old Brian Diez, had fathered 4-year-old Kaia Diez and 1-year-old Cole Diez with Langstaff.

 Lake Havasu City police Sgt. Joe Harrold says Diez was arrested Aug. 13 for violating a protection order Langstaff had against him.

 When police responded to the home, they discovered four people dead at the scene and two others — 20-year-old Brock Kelson and 44-year-old Deborah Nyland — needing medical attention. Police said Sunday that the alleged gunman, 26-year-old Brian Diez, had fathered 4-year-old Kaia Diez and 1-year-old Cole Diez with Langstaff.

Lake Havasu City police Sgt. Joe Harrold says Diez was arrested Aug. 13 for violating a protection order Langstaff had against him.

When police responded to the home, they discovered four people dead at the scene and two others — 20-year-old Brock Kelson and 44-year-old Deborah Nyland — needing medical attention.