Domestic violence resources

I was without power for three days last week on account of the snow storm, so I started cleaning out some papers. I found a few that I’d like to post, even though they might be a few years old.

WATCH  This group does court monitoring in Minnesota. I had a WATCH brief called WATCH Report II:  The Impact of Minnesota’s Felony Strangulation Law May, 2009. The link I provide has several of their briefs. In the brief I have, it’s startling to read that Minnesota was only the sixth state to make strangulation of a family member a felony-level crime. Prio to this law, strangulation was a misdemeanor that could be reduced to disorderly conduct. It says 23-68% of female victims of domestic violence have experienced at least one strangulation and that strangulation is an indicator of escalating violence and potential lethality.

Resource Center on Domestic Violence: Child Protection and Custody – This Web site has many resources, including a database that has domestic and family violence legislation.

This is a link to a study looking at Men’s Rights and domestic violence: Men’s Rights and Feminist Advocacy in Canadian Domestic Violence Policy Arenas 

Men’s Rights and Feminist Advocacy in Canadian Domestic Violence Policy Arenas Contexts, Dynamics, and Outcomes of Antifeminist Backlash

Ruth M. Mann
This article examines government and advocacy group texts on three recent Canadian domestic violence policy moments. Drawing on governance, feminist poststructuralist, and social movement perspectives, it examines men’s rights advocates’ and feminists’ discursive actions and their influence on officials. The research aim is to explore the provisional, intrinsically incomplete, and indeed questionable success, to date, of Canadian anti-domestic violence advocates’ strategies and tactics of resisting men’s advocates’ efforts to delegitimize gendered constructions of domestic violence. At the level of political action, the article contributes to efforts by feminists internationally to safeguard protections and supports for abused women and children in a political context marked by the increasingly prominent influence of men’s rights and associated antiprogressive backlash.

NOTE: This link also has Michael Kimmel’s substantive look at “gender symmetry”

This is a link to Bala’s study on false allegations, noting men make more than women (but you’d never know that from the myths and stereotypes) –

 Results: Consistent with other national studies of reported child maltreatment, CIS-98 data indicate that more than one-third of maltreatment investigations are unsubstantiated, but only 4% of all cases are considered to be intentionally fabricated. Within the subsample of cases wherein a custody or access dispute has occurred, the rate of intentionally false allegations is higher: 12%. Results of this analysis show that neglect is the most common form of intentionally fabricated maltreatment, while anonymous reporters and noncustodial parents (usually fathers) most frequently make intentionally false reports. Of the intentionally false allegations of maltreatment tracked by the CIS-98, custodial parents (usually mothers) and children were least likely to fabricate reports of abuse or neglect. Conclusions: While the CIS-98 documents that the rate of intentionally false allegations is relatively low, these results raise important clinical and legal issues, which require further consideration.

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One comment on “Domestic violence resources

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Claudine Dombrowski, S. Vyers. S. Vyers said: Domestic violence resources « Media Misses http://bit.ly/g4HA8K […]

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