Where’s the outrage?

Where’s the outrage when girls are raped and videotaped? Where’s the outrage when women are targeted because they’re female and killed? Where’s the language to express the horrors of being stabbed in the face and torso by a person you once loved?

Notice the difference in these 2 articles – one calls for outrage over the suicide of a young boy caught on tape having sex with another male. The other rationalizes the behavior of videotaping a teen girl being gang-raped – the video spread widely on Facebook.

With Tyler Clementi’s death, let’s try friending decency 

…we should add an urgent call to renew respect for privacy. As a community of decent people, we have to rally ourselves to stop the insanity of narcissism and exhibitionism that inculcates the broader notion that nothing is off-limits.

And-

Whether or not you agree with the anti-smoking movement, you can concede that it worked. Why not apply the same template to those who would invade another’s space? We don’t want to outlaw cameras or otherwise limit free expression, but we can certainly make it unattractive and unacceptable to intrude on others. Next time someone takes your picture or posts it on the Internet without your permission, raise the roof. Point a finger. Stand athwart civilization and yell, “No more.”

When others are victimized by another’s lack of scruples, be outraged. And never publish or distribute images of anyone without his or her permission.

Now compare this to Tracy Clark-Flory’s account of the girl who was raped and videotaped:

Teens share photos of assault on Facebook

For the most part, these are not pedophilic child pornography collectors; many of the distributors are teenagers themselves. This of course has many adults asking that age-old question: What’s wrong with kids these days? I suspect there are a couple explanations that do not require us to label “kids these days” as amoral animals.

And-

These sorts of images are the norm. We have access to them, they exist, and so we view them — duh. Carry this view a little further and it isn’t hard to understand how even a nonsociopathic teenager might opt to view a photo of a girl’s rape, or even send it along to a friend. This is so often how we share things, good and bad; we hit “forward” or “re-tweet” or “like,” etc. Technology offers us a sense of privacy, and detachment, even as we’re sharing these things with the entire Web. The online mentality is one of entitlement and total freedom, no one has ownership over anything (just ask record label execs). I would venture to say that it hasn’t even occurred to many of the kids — the ones who are not, you know, patently evil — that they are violating this girl themselves.

Forgive them sisters for they know not what they do?! I don’t think so.

This case demands as much outrage as the case of the Rutgers student. The young girl did not commit suicide, but she will be at risk for suicide as well as other mental and possibly physical repercussions.

 Please contact Tracy at Tracy@salon.com to let her know the case deserves outrage. Share the case with other media outlets, let the media know that women’s lives have as much value as men’s lives, let the media know you want to read about women, too. This case was virtually ignored by the media. The similarities should have been pointed out – it’s not just the LGBT community that faces such discrimination.

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